Maya Indian Arts (Unique Indian Arts In Australia)

Indian Arts- From the ancient land of advanced civilisation

Indian art has a very long tradition and history. The earliest were the rock paintings of pre-historic times that were found in rock shelters, some of which are 30,000 years old. For instance, the Ajanta caves in Western India dating approximately 2nd Century BC are now recognised as some of the greatest art produced by humankind in any century, as well as the finest picture gallery to survive from any ancient civilisation. Interestingly, it shows women in prominent and powerful roles. 


From the early civilisation through to the present day, Indian paintings provide a beautiful continuum. The fine lines, colour and form produce a rhythmical and harmonious musical effect with influence of aesthetic geometry deriving from the ancient world. The melting pot of diverse cultures and traditions has a strong influence over the art forms and present an array of distinctive creations.

Our Collections

We present exquisite Indian arts created by talented artists from India (including rural parts of India). We work with the artists to create this array of colours. Currently, our range of arts include authentic Bengal style of art, Kangra Miniatures, Madhubani (Mithila art), Nirmal art, Warli art while touching by Modern & Contemporary Indian art. 

The lines, forms and colours in the traditional art forms produce a rhythmical and harmonious musical effect with influence of aesthetic geometry deriving from the ancient world. 

Bengal Style of art

Madhubani (aka Mithila Art)

Bengal Style of art

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 Bengal Style of Art or Indian style of painting is a style of Indian painting with bold-sweeping brush strokes, it originated in Bengal, primarily Kolkata and Shantiniketan, and flourished throughout India during the British Raj in the early 20th century. Eventually it led to the development of the modern Indian painting. 

Kangra Miniatures

Madhubani (aka Mithila Art)

Bengal Style of art

Kangra Miniatures

This pictorial art of Kangra is named after Kangra from the North Indian state of Himachal Pradesh and are also protected by Geographical Indicator (GI). Once practised only in the royal courts, this exquisite miniature art form strongly depicts greenery, naturalism & the rich biodiversity of the Himalayan state. The paintings also depict feminine charm in a very graceful manner articulately portraying refined, tender emotions of Indian women. However, this iconic Indian art is at the verge of extinction today and there is an urgent need to promote it vigorously to nourish this cultural heritage of the world. These miniatures are beautifully painted with mineral pigments and pure gold on handmade paper

Madhubani (aka Mithila Art)

Madhubani (aka Mithila Art)

Madhubani (aka Mithila Art)

Madhubani art

 The folk art of Madhubani, is practiced in Northern Bihar, India and has a Geographical Indicator (GI) which means it is region specific- a tag of authenticity identifying the paintings of its geographic origin. Traditionally, ONLY WOMEN from the region have been painting their interior walls and floors sharing their stories and domestic rituals through this highly totemic art form which is at least over 3000-year old. These were mostly hidden from the outsiders. 

In 1934, Bihar was affected by a massive earthquake. While inspecting the damage caused by the natural calamity, these arts were accidentally discovered by the British colonial officer in Madhubani District, William G. Archer and after lying low for centuries, for the first time the art was brought to the notice of the outside world. He was "entranced" by the beauty of these paintings and described: "What they took for granted, I considered superb. They were unconscious, I was conscious. But whether deliberate or accidental, the art was there and it made us one. I had never felt myself so Maithil as on that day when faced with shattered walls, I saw the beauty on the mud".

Nirmal Art

Nirmal Art

Madhubani (aka Mithila Art)

Nirmal Art

 A region nestled along the heavily forested Godavari river basin in the Southern Indian state of Telangana, a hotspot where cultural diversity prospered, rich historical traditions thrived, was inhabited during the Mesolithic and Paleolithic periods. That is the birthplace of a 14th century art form inspired by the floral designs and frescoes of the ancient Ajanta/Ellora and Mughal miniatures. 

  

It is belived that the art came into existence when a king named Nimma Naidu introduced this art to the local people. Nirmal art was practised in the 14th century by a group of artisans who were known as Naqash. Over the years, this art form was also patronised by many Deccan Nawabs by incorporating it to their royal courts and households. 

Nirmal art, is protected with Geographical Indication (GI) - which means not any artworks can be called as Nirmal art unless it originate from that specific region. The uniquely crafted art on lacquer coated teakwood, with bright colours and gold dust surely charm the senses.   



Warli Art

Nirmal Art

Warli Art

Warli Art

 Warli art is a unique indigenous art form that got its name from Warli tribes of the Indian state of Maharashtra. This art form has a close connection with the Neolithic cave/rock paintings of Central India dating back to 3000 to 2500 BCE.

It is protected with Geographical Indication (GI) - which means not any artworks can be called as Warli art if it does not originate from that specific region. We believe that this is an extraordinary piece of heritage to be conserved for the world.