Noor-e-Nirmal: The 14th Century Splendour!

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Introducing: Noor-e-Nirmal: The 14th Century Splendour!

A region nestled along the heavily forested Godavari river basin in the Southern Indian state of Telangana, a hotspot where cultural diversity prospered, rich historical traditions thrived, was inhabited during the Mesolithic and Paleolithic periods. That is the birthplace of a 14thcentury art form inspired by the floral designs and frescoes of the ancient Ajanta/Ellora and Mughal miniatures. Presenting Nirmal Art through our initiative- Noor-e-Nirmal: The 14th Century Splendour!

Literally, the word Noor is derived from the Arabic word meaning ‘the divine light’ and 'Nirmal' is derived from the Sankrit word meaning ‘Pure.  Throughout the coming months, we will introduce many facets of this very unique art form, as we believe this divine art needs to re-shine and re-live in the light of human attention…


It is belived that the art came into existence when a king named Nimma Naidu introduced this art to the local people. Nirmal art was practised in the 14th century by a group of artisans who were known as Naqash. Over the years, this art form was also patronised by many Deccan Nawabs by incorporating it to their royal courts and households. 


Nirmal art, is protected with Geographical Indication (GI) - which means not any artworks can be called as Nirmal art unless it originate from that specific region. The uniquely crafted art on lacquer coated teak wood, with bright colours and gold dust surely charm the senses. 


We believe this is an extraordinary piece of heritage, a rare artistry to be conserved for the world to appreciate. We are delighted to have collaborated with the key stakeholders of the art form to introduce and showcase it in its original form to art patrons in Australia.


The art also depicts the feminine charm in a very graceful and lyrical manner. Hence, in the month of March, while celebrating women, we present these magnificent creations. 


We are truly thankful to State Bank of India (SBI), Australia for supporting this initiative.


Please visit us at Maya Emporium, our exclusive Darjeeling Tea and Indian Art Gallery located at 5/608 Pacific Highway, Killara (www.mayaemporium.com.au) for a glimpse into these wonderful creations.